2017-02-21 Tue

Observations

So last Saturday, as is my wont, I headed over to the Eaton Chelsea Hotel for my four-dollar coffee-and-two-newspapers. This is the same Eaton Chelsea Hotel that charged me eighteen dollars the time I decided to have a coffee and two croissants.

It turned out that the coffee is $4, but the breakfast is a flat fee of $18, but it is buffet-style – all you can eat.

Well, I’ve been sponging off the Eaton Chelsea Hotel for over three years now, so just for a giggle I paid the $18 and went back several times for muffins, chocolate croissants, cheese croissants, more coffee ...

Well, to last Saturday. Now I understand why so many trays are left on table with toast, scrambled egg, bacon, and all sorts of stuff. Of Course! It’s all you can eat buffet, so if you are on vacation you load up with food, and go back for seconds, even thirds, until you are too stuffed to eat anymore.

Then you leave a tray of plates with toast, scrambled egg, bacon, and all sorts of stuff

Observations

Christopher Greaves Home_IMG_20170216_140939857_HDR.jpg

Here I am sitting in “Café M”, west side of Yonge Street near St Mary Street. I am looking out of the window towards the north-east.

I shall miss these two-, three- and four-storey buildings when they are gone, for gone they soon will be. Toronto has embarked on a process of demolishing buildings and erecting 60-storey towers.

The individual and often quirky businesses disappear and are replaced with a few ground-floor chain outlets. Starbucks coffee, Subway sandwiches, Pizza-Pizza pizza places. You know.

I was struck by my loss.

In particular the current view is three-dimensional. Look closely and you will count at least twelve levels of building, “levels” in the sense of distance. It is very much like a stage set with flats going all the way to the rear of the stage.

This three-dimensional view will be replaced by a two-dimensional will of blue-green-grey glass that towers up to the heavens, “heavens”, for we will surely be in hell.

I suspect that our brains are hard-wired to enjoy three-dimensional views, but treat two-dimensional views as boring and potentially dangerous.