2016-03-01 Tue

A Day in the Life of

Apropos A Day in the Life of I thought to add another snippet, part of a day.

Last Tuesday I left home and walked down Yonge Street to drop off my entry for the Toronto Star Short Story contest. A ridiculous idea if ever there was one. The winner Ė by definition the person who submits the best story, ergo The Best Writer Ė wins a $3,000 course in Ė CREATIVE WRITING at Humber College. Something they clearly donít need as much as do the other 9,999 entrants.

Me included.

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Tuesday is a lunchtime concert at Yorkminster Park Baptist, Heath street north of St Clair Avenue, so I walked up Yonge Street, through my district, and enjoyed the concert before walking home.

Then I walked home.

It doesnít look much on Google Maps; just a relaxing pale blue line. But itís over eleven kilometres.

Of course, I had already strolled down to Ryerson University and back for the morning paper.

Wheel Trans

Wheel Trans is a service that carries wheel-chair dependent people around the city. It is administered by the Toronto Transit Commission.

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My building houses quite a few seniors with wheel-chairs. When I exit the elevator on the ground floor, or when I return to the building, chances are that Iíll meet someone waiting for Wheel Trans.

I have some limited experience with disability; VERY limited. When I moved in here I spent some time lugging cartons of possessions in a bundle-buggy. That introduced me to the hurdles and obstacles place din the way of wheel-chair people.

I learned which subway stops were not suited for wheeled equipment (mine: College) and the problems of embarking and disembarking on a regular Toronto Transit Commission bus.

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So the Toronto Transit Commission has a so-called cutting edge plan which will be implemented in about nine years time.

If you ask me the knife is blunt.

Or the chisel.

Wheel Trans

Wheel Trans is a service that carries wheel-chair dependent people around the city. It is administered by the Toronto Transit Commission.

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More data.

You can bet that someone in the Toronto Transit Commission has just woken up and learned a new term: ďBaby BoomĒ.

Who knew that starting around 2010 a flood of people would appear to be old and in need of wheel-chair suitable transit.

Never saw THAT coming!

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I have a suggestion: Focus on moving wheel-chair people to and from Toronto Transit Commission stations that are wheel-chair accessible.

Such as Wellesley (immediately to the north of College) and Dundas (immediately south).

I suspect that quite a few people in wheelchairs and with walking-frames would be happy to get on the Toronto Transit Commission, especially if their destination was accessible.

Arriving at your destination then waiting for a Wheel-Trans bus to complete your trip would probably be prohibitively expensive in time, money, and frustration.

So I wonder how many Wheel Trans trips run between my building (heart of downtown) and the western suburbs because it is too difficult for people to use the local station.