2016-01-18 Mon

Second Use For Everything (SUFE)

Continuing the series based on Toronto City Council’s new release of its ecology calendar, which has so many holes that it should be renamed the ecology colander

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This had me scratching my wooden head. In the past the city stressed the importance of bagging trees; high-rise building management in particular boosted tree bags as a way to avoid having pine-needles stuck in the carpeting.

Now the city says that it will not accept trees in bags?

(This is the calendar that omitted to include Canada’s second official language – French – in the language renditions of what-to-do, so the City of Toronto may just be recycling its lack of editing proficiency)

Second Use For Everything (SUFE)

Continuing the series based on Toronto City Council’s new release of its ecology calendar, which has so many holes that it should be renamed the ecology colander

Christopher Greaves Home_DSCN3559.JPG

I still don’t understand a single municipalities approach to processing matter from the recycling bins.

That means that every municipality had different processes and hence different rules.

I understand that processing all waste in a single stream can be more expensive than separation at source. Indeed, I am all in favour of separation at source. I think that all kitchen and food scraps should be diverted in the home and processed in a vermicomposter.

Back to processes: There can be only two forms of process in recycling; (1) Positive and (2) Negative.

Positive can be described as having a system that detects useful material and yanks it out of the stream. Ferrous (magnetic) metals is an example of this. You can imagine material rolling on a conveyor belt and magnetic material being pulled sideways (or upwards) to a magnet and then deposited in a “ferrous metals” bin.

Negative can be described as having a system that detects useless material and yanks it out of the stream. Light plastics are an example of this. You can imagine material rolling on a conveyor belt and light plastic material being blown sideways (or upwards) by a jet of air and then deposited in a “light plastics” bin.

So I don’t understand this list of Sins. Surely if the processing of “Recycle Bin” material is at all good, it ought to be good at obtaining useful material from the stream; the rest is true garbage and can be treated as such.

And it has to be way more efficient to collect True Garbage from a recycling plant than by sending even more diesel trucks along the residential streets.